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MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY

MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY

English Vocabulary

MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY

Most Common Weather English Vocabulary

Most Common Weather English Vocabulary | IELTS Examinar may ask about weather in IELTS speaking module so students should get ready to learn these following weather vocabulary. IELTS speaking vocabulary about weather is given below:

Barometer |MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY
[count]
1
: an instrument that is used to measure air pressure and predict changes in the weather
2
: something that is used to indicate or predict something
The test is used as a barometer [=standard] to measure a student’s reading level.
Economists see housing prices as a barometer for inflation. [=economists use housing prices to predict inflation]
— often + of
A player’s rookie season is not always a good/accurate barometer of his success in the league.
Wealth is not a barometer of happiness.

blizzard|MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY
[count]
1
: a severe snowstorm that goes on for a long time
We were snowed in by a raging/fierce blizzard.
2
: a large amount of something that comes suddenly — usually singular
a blizzard of mail
The audience confronted him with a blizzard of questions.

breezy /?bri?zi/ adjective
breezier; breeziest
1
: having strong winds : windy
a breezy day
a breezy beach
2
: informal and lively
a breezy essay
I enjoy the author’s breezy style.
3
: relaxed in a way that shows you are not concerned about or interested in something
She listened to their complaints with breezy indifference.
— breezily /?bri?z?li/ adverb
He breezily dismissed

chilly|MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY
chilly /?t??li/ adjective
chillier; chilliest

[also more chilly; most chilly]
1
: noticeably cold
a chilly morning
a chilly breeze
It’s a little chilly outside.
2
: feeling cold
I was getting chilly.
You must be chilly without a coat on.
3
: noticeably unfriendly
They gave him a chilly reception.
— chilliness noun
[noncount]
the chilliness of the air
[singular]
She felt a chilliness in his voice.

flurry|MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY
[count]
1
: a brief and light snowfall
We had a few flurries yesterday.
a snow flurry
2
a : a brief period of excitement or activity — + of
There was a flurry of trading in the stock exchange.
The incident could create a flurry of interest in safety issues.
b : a large amount of something that happens or comes suddenly — + of
a flurry [=barrage] of publicity
There was a flurry of requests for more information.
cold front
[count]
: the front edge of a moving mass of cold air
A cold front will move in tomorrow, bringing with it clear skies.
cloudy|MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY
cloudy /?kla?di/ adjective
cloudier; cloudiest

[also more cloudy; most cloudy]
1
: having many clouds in the sky
Tomorrow will be cloudy and cold.
a cloudy day
cloudy weather
: covered with clouds
partly cloudy skies
2
: not clean or clear
cloudy [=murky] water
cloudy eyes
— cloudiness noun [noncount]
We’ll have clear skies in the morning with increasing cloudiness in the afternoon.

gust|MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY
plural gusts
[count]
: a sudden strong wind
His hat was blown off by a sudden gust (of wind).
Today’s weather will be windy, with gusts of up to 40 miles per hour.
— often used figuratively
gusts of laughter
a gust of emotion
— gustiness /?g?stin?s/ noun [noncount]
the gustiness of the winds
— gusty /?g?sti/ adjective gustier; gustiest
a gusty day
gusty winds
gusts; gusted; gusting
to blow strongly for a short time : to blow in gusts
The forecast calls for winds gusting up to 10 miles per hour.

high–pressure |MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY
always used before a noun
1
: using or involving forceful methods to sell something
a high-pressure salesman
high-pressure sales tactics
2
[more high–pressure; most high–pressure] : causing or involving a lot of mental or emotional stress : very stressful
She has a high-pressure job on Wall Street.
the high-pressure world of advertising
3
a : having or using a lot of force or pressure from air, water, etc.
a high-pressure hose
gas stored in a high-pressure container
b of weather : having a high atmospheric pressure
A high-pressure system will bring us better weather later this week.
a high-pressure center/area

humidity |MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY

humidity /hju?m?d?ti/ noun

[noncount]
: moisture in the air
the humidity of the region
It’s not the heat that will get you—it’s the humidity.
: the amount of moisture in the air
The temperature is 67 degrees with humidity at 75 percent.
an area of low/high humidity

hurricane|MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY

hurricane /?h?r??ke?n/ Brit /?h?r?k?n/ noun
plural hurricanes

[count]
: an extremely large, powerful, and destructive storm with very strong winds that occurs especially in the western part of the Atlantic Ocean

lightning MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY
lightning strike (noun)
heat lightning (noun)
sheet lightning (noun)
lightning (noun)
lightning (adjective)
lightning bug (noun)
lightning conductor (noun)
lightning rod (noun)

1 lightning /?la?tn??/ noun

[noncount]
: the flashes of light that are produced in the sky during a storm
a bolt of lightning = a lightning bolt
a flash of lightning
The tree was hit/struck by lightning. = The tree was hit by a lightning strike.
— compare thunder; see also heat lightning
catch/capture lightning in a bottle chiefly US
: to succeed in a way that is very lucky or unlikely
He caught lightning in a bottle with the success of his very first book.
lightning never strikes (the same place) twice
— used to say that a very unusual event is not likely to happen again to the same person or in the same place
like (greased) lightning informal
: very quickly
The news traveled across the country like lightning.
moving like greased lightning
2 lightning /?la?tn??/ adjective

always used before a noun
: moving or done very quickly
thoughts moving at lightning speed
— lightning adverb
— used in combination
an athlete with lightning-quick reflexes
making lightning-fast adjustments

muggy| MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY

muggy /?m?gi/ adjective
muggier; muggiest

: unpleasantly warm and humid
a muggy day in August
It’s very muggy out today.
muggy weather
overcast| MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY

[more overcast; most overcast]
: covered with clouds
The sky was overcast.
: darkened by clouds
It was an overcast morning.
They worked in overcast condition

 

POUR | MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY
pours; poured; pouring

1
[+ object] : to cause (something) to flow in a steady stream from or into a container or place
He carefully poured the water into her glass.
Pour the sauce over the pasta.
She poured salt into the palm of her hand and then sprinkled it over the stew.
[+] more examples
— sometimes used figuratively
She poured scorn on the plan. [=she talked about the plan in a very critical and scornful way]
2
: to fill a cup or glass with a drink for someone
[+ object]
Will you pour (out) the wine? [=will you fill everyone’s glass with wine?]
Pour a drink for me, please. = Pour me a drink, please.
Can I pour you some lemonade?
He poured [=served] himself a (cup of) coffee.
[no object]
Could you please pour?
3
always followed by an adverb or preposition, [no object] : to flow or move continuously in a steady stream
Light poured [=streamed] down from the hole in the roof.
Smoke poured out from the chimney.
Sweat was pouring from her brow.
— often used figuratively
Music pours out of the dance clubs at night.
All of his pent-up emotion came pouring out.
She started crying, and then the whole story of what happened came pouring out.
[+] more examples
4
[no object]
a : to rain heavily
It poured all day.
It was pouring the whole time we were there.
(Brit) It is pouring (down) with rain.
b of rain : to come down heavily
The rain poured down.
We had to wait for hours in the pouring rain.
pour cold water on
— see 1water
pour into [phrasal verb]
pour (something) into (something)
: to spend (a large amount of money, time, energy, etc.) on something
She has poured thousands (of dollars) into the business.
He has been pouring all his time/resources into the project.
pour oil on troubled waters chiefly British
: to try to make peace between people who are arguing
pour on [phrasal verb]
1
pour on (something) or pour (something) on : to produce a lot of (something) in order to achieve something
The defense poured on the pressure in the second half of the game.
He really poured on the charm to get her to have dinner with him.
2
pour it on informal
a : to talk about something in an emotional way that is not sincere in order to get sympathy, attention, etc.
When he saw that she felt sorry for him, he really poured it on.
b chiefly US : to do something in a very energetic and effective way
After they took the lead in the second half, they really started to pour it on. [=they started to score a lot of points very quickly]
pour out [phrasal verb]
pour out (something) or pour (something) out
: to freely express (an emotion) : to talk freely about (something personal)
I listened while he poured out his anger and frustration.
I’m sorry about pouring out my troubles like this.
She poured out the whole story.
pour your heart/soul out or pour out your heart/soul
: to speak very freely to someone about your private and most deeply felt emotions
He’ll pour his heart out to anyone who will listen.
when it rains, it pours or it never rains but it pours

THUNDERSTROMMOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY

THUNDERSTROM /???nd??sto?m/ noun
plural thunderstorms

[count]
: a storm with lightning and thunder
There are thunderstorms in the forecast.
The weather service has issued a severe thunderstorm warning.

TORNADO | MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY

TORNADO /to??ne?do?/ noun
plural tornadoes or tornados

[count]
: a violent and destructive storm in which powerful winds move around a central point
in the path of a tornado
a tornado warning

WARM FRONT  | MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY

WARM FRONT
plural warm fronts

[count]
: the front edge of a moving mass of warm air
An approaching warm front often means that rain is coming.

STROM | MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY

STROM /?sto?m/ noun
plural storms

[count]
1
: an occurrence of bad weather in which there is a lot of rain, snow, etc., and often strong winds
The sky got dark and it looked like a storm was coming.
A storm was brewing.
We made it home before the storm struck/broke. [=before the storm began]
I went out for a walk and got caught in a storm. [=I was outside when the storm began]
: a sudden occurrence of something in large amounts — usually singular — often + of
a storm of publicity
The speaker was greeted with a storm of applause.
a storm of punches
— see also brainstorm
b : a situation in which many people are angry, upset, etc. — usually singular
His racial comments kicked/whipped/stirred up a storm in the newspapers. [=newspapers criticized his racial comments very strongly]
— often + of
a storm of controversy/protest
any port in a storm
— see 1port
a storm in a teacup British
: a situation in which people are very angry or upset about something that is not important
The whole controversy turned out to be a storm in a teacup. [=(US) a tempest in a teapot]
take (something) by storm
1
: to quickly become very successful or popular in (a particular place) or among (a particular group)
The writer has taken the literary world by storm.
The new fashion has taken London by storm.
2
: to attack and capture (a place) suddenly by using a lot of force or a large number of people
The soldiers took the castle by storm.
the calm/lull before the storm
: a period of quiet that comes before a time of activity, excitement, violence, etc.
The college was quiet that morning, but it was the calm before the storm. Thousands of students would arrive later.
up a storm informal
— used to say that something is being done with a lot of energy or enthusiasm
They danced/sang up a storm.
He was cooking up a storm.
weather the storm or ride out the storm
: to deal with a difficult situation without being harmed or damaged too much
Newspapers have weathered the storm of online information by providing news online themselves.
It was a difficult time but they managed to ride out the storm.
2 storm /?sto?m/ verb
storms; stormed; storming

1
[no object] — used with it to say that a storm (sense 1) is happening
It stormed all night.
2
: to attack (something) suddenly with a lot of force or with a large number of people
[+ object]
Soldiers stormed the fort.
Police stormed the building.
[no object]
The army stormed ashore.
3
always followed by an adverb or preposition, [no object] : to go quickly and in an angry, loud way
The mob stormed through the streets.
She yelled at us and stormed off.
He stormed out of the room.
She stormed into the office.
4
: to shout loudly and angrily
[no object]
— often + at
She stormed at her parents and ran to her room.
[+ object]
“Do you know who I am?” he stormed.

SUNNY | MOST COMMON WEATHER ENGLISH VOCABULARY

SUNNY /?s?ni/ adjective
sunnier; sunniest

1
: having plenty of bright sunlight
a sunny room/day
sunny weather
the sunniest parts of the country

 

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