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IELTS PHRASAL VERBS VOCABULARY

IELTS PHRASAL VERBS VOCABULARY

IELTS

IELTS PHRASAL VERBS VOCABULARY

IELTS PHRASAL VERBS VOCABULARY

Ielts phrasal verbs vocabulary is very most important thing for speaking,reading,writing and writing.They cover a lot for your writing ,reading,listening and speaking.Remember them in your daily speaking routine ,some Ielts phrasel verbs vocabulary is given below:

Ielts preparation basic vocabulary

ask somebody out invite on a date
ask around ask many people the same question
add up to something equal
Bring up — To mention something.
Bring on — To cause something to happen, usually something negative. (The two parts of this phrasal verb can be separated by what’s happening.)
Bring it on! — To accept a challenge with confidence.
Bring on To cause something to happen, usually something negative.
back something up reverse
back somebody up support
blow up explode
blow something up add air
Bring it on To accept a challenge with confidence.
break down stop functioning (vehicle, machine)
break down get upset
break something down divide into smaller parts
break in force entry to a building
break into something enter forcibly
break something in wear something a few times so that it doesn’t look/feel new
break in interrupt
break up end a relationship
break up start laughing (informal)
break out escape
break out in something develop a skin condition
Call on This can mean either to visit someone, or to use someone’s or something’s knowledge.
Call off To cancel something.
call back summon to return
call off postpone indefinitely or annul something that was scheduled
catch on understand, usually after some initial difficulty
catch up with catch up with and possibly overtake
check in announce one’s arrival, e.g. at hotels or airports
check out examine so as to determine accuracy, quality, or condition
cheer up
cause (somebody) to feel happier or more cheerful
clean up
Cheer on — To support someone by giving them words of encouragement.
Come up — To bring up a topic, or when something happens unexpectedly.
Come in — To enter
Come across — To meet or find by chance.
Come forward — To volunteer information about something, like a crime.
Cut off — This phrase can be used in several ways, but its general meaning is “to interrupt or stop something.”
catch up get to the same point as somebody else
chip in help
Cut (it) out — This phrase has the same meaning as saying “Stop it.”
Cut in — To interrupt someone when they are speaking.
Drop by/in — To stop by for a visit, for a short time.
Drop by/in — To stop by for a visit, for a short time.
Drop off — To leave something or someone in their destination. (Can be separated by the object being dropped off.)
Fall apart — This phrase means “to break into pieces,” but it can be used to talk about things that are not physical, like a marriage or a person.
Fall down — To drop to the ground, usually by accident.
Fill (someone) in — To give someone the details about something. (Is usually separated by the person getting filled in).
Fill up — To become completely full.
Fall apart — This phrase means “to break into pieces,”
Fall down — To drop to the ground, usually by accident.
Fill (someone) in — To give someone the details about something.
Fill up — To become completely full.
fall down fall to the ground
fall out (of hair, teeth) become loose and unattached
Get away — To escape. You may have heard the phrase “getaway car.”
Get around — To solve a problem by avoiding the main issue.
Get along (with) — To have a friendly relationship with someone.
Get up — To stand up, or to wake up.
Get back to — To return to someone or something.
Get back at — To get revenge on someone.
Give out — This phrase can mean to break down or stop working, or to hand out or distribute something.
Give in — To surrender, especially in a fight or argument.
Give away — To hand things out for free.
Give up — To stop trying, surrender.
get along/on like each other
get away with something do without being noticed or punished
Go out (with) — To go on a date with someone.
Go ahead — To go in front of someone, or to give permission to do or say something.
Grow up — To grow up, sometimes used to tell someone to stop acting childish.
Grow apart — To get distant from someone, like a friend.
Get away — To escape. You may have heard the phrase “getaway car.” That’s the car used by criminals to run away from a crime scene, like a bank robbery.
Get around — To solve a problem by avoiding the main issue. This phrase can also be used very informally to refer to someone who has many sexual partners. As you can imagine, it’s not very nice to say that someone “gets around”!
Get along (with) — To have a friendly relationship with someone.
Get up — To stand up, or to wake up.
Get back to — To return to someone or something. This phrase is often used to say that you will return with an answer to a question or a request at a later time.
Get back at — To get revenge on someone
Give out — This phrase can mean to break down or stop working, or to hand out or distribute something.
Give in — To surrender, especially in a fight or argument.
Give away — To hand things out for free. (Can be separated by the item being given away.)
Give up — To stop trying, surrender
Go out (with) — To go on a date with someone.
Go ahead — To go in front of someone, or to give permission to do or say something
Grow up — To grow up, sometimes used to tell someone to stop acting childish
Grow apart — To get distant from someone, like a friend
Hang on — To keep something.
Hang out — To spend time with someone, casually.
Hang up — To end a call on the phone, especially if it’s before the other person is ready.
Hold on — To hold something tightly. This phrase can also be a way of asking someone to wait for a moment.
Hold back — To stop yourself from doing or saying something.
Hang on — To keep something.
Hang out — To spend time with someone, casually.
Hang up — To end a call on the phone, especially if it’s before the other person is ready.
hang in stay positive (informal)
Hold on — To hold something tightly. This phrase can also be a way of asking someone to wait for a moment.
Hold back — To stop yourself from doing or saying something.
Log in (to) — Used with computers, this phrase means to sign into your account on a website or computer.
Log out/off — Also used with computers, this phrase means to sign out of your account.
Look up — To check the meaning of something.
Look out — To watch out for something.
look up to somebody have a lot of respect for
Pay back — To give someone back money that you owe them.
Pay for — This phrase can either mean to give someone money for a particular purpose
Put out — This phrase can mean to extinguish a fire, or to irritate someone by asking them for a favor.
pass something out give the same thing to many people
put something out extinguish
Log in (to) — Used with computers, this phrase means to sign into your account on a website or computer.
Log out/off — Also used with computers, this phrase means to sign out of your account.
Look up — To check the meaning of something. (Can be separated by the item being looked up).
Look out — To watch out for something
Pay back — To give someone back money that you owe them. (Can be separated by the person getting paid back.) When it’s written as one word, “payback” means revenge.
Pay for — This phrase can either mean to give someone money for a particular purpose (like paying for a new car), or to suffer because of something you did.
Put out — This phrase can mean to extinguish a fire, or to irritate someone by asking them for a favor. (In the case of annoying someone, can be separated by the person getting annoyed.) Be aware that in very informal slang, this phrase has a more offensive meaning.
Put on — To get your clothes or makeup on.
Take off — This phrase can mean to remove clothing, or to leave for a journey
Take out — To remove something, like from a pocket or a bag.
Turn on/off — To switch a machine or light on or off.
Turn around — To move so that you’re facing the opposite direction.
Turn up — When someone that was lost is found unexpectedly.
Warm up (to) — To start liking someone or something more as you spend more time with them, especially if you didn’t really like them in the beginning.
Work out — To exercise

Related : IELTS WRITING TASK 1 GRAPH VOCABULARY WORDS

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